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October 24, 2013

Crude Oil Export Delayed!

The Surfrider Foundation in cooperation with other allies won a case with the Shoreline Hearings Board delaying 2 crude oil export terminals from being authorized in Gray’s Harbor. This was a big victory for the continued protection and enjoyment of our coastal waves and marine environment. For the report from Seattle King 5 news check out the link below and thanks to everyone associated with it for their work and support. http://www.king5.com/news/environment/State-board-derails-oil-plan-227151741.html

October 9, 2013 | 2 Comments

The Best MSP Video To Date

The Surfrider Foundation is working with several partner organizations to bring to you, the residents of Washington State, the most comprehensive planning process for coastal and marine resources to date.

To educate the public and encourage participation in the process, we have developed a short video that explains what Marine Spatial Planing (MSP) is really all about, why it is important, and how you can get involved.

To learn more and get engaged in the MSP process, visit:
http://www.msp.wa.gov/

For more about Surfrider in Washington state, visit:
http://wa.surfrider.org/

October 8, 2013

WA MSP Film Released!!

Some have already seen it and the reviews are solid. Please check out this short video put together by Swell Productions with help from Surfrider members and affiliates in Washington. The imagery is beautiful as it captures how incredible our coast is and why Marine Spatial Planning is a great tool we can use to continue to maintain the excellent quality of recreation provided on our coast.

October 2, 2013

Great Summary of Ocean Acidification and Local Impacts by Oregon Surfrider Staff

Gus Gates, my colleague in Oregon, has put together an excellent summary of Ocean Acidification and how local actions can have significantly impacts, for better or for worse.

The emerging issue of ocean acidification (OA) has been getting a lot of recent attention via media, in community ocean forums, and by elected officials wondering what role governments might be able to play in addressing its impacts. While it’s important that we recognize that this is a global issue largely resulting from the increased amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) being pumped into the atmosphere and absorbed by the ocean, it’s also important to understand that there are local actions that can help mitigate the impacts of acidification on aquatic ecosystems and regional economies and cultures. Many of these local actions are directly connected to Surfrider’s existing clean water programs and campaigns.

Read the whole post here.

September 24, 2013

PNW Conference Recap

A great turnout and an amazing weekend at the PNW conference. Activists from WA, OR, and BC made the trek to Westport to learn, bond, and celebrate all the amazing work they are doing. The conference presentations covered several important subjects such as coastal policy, chapter programs, and the current state of Surfrider in general. It was a great time and thanks to all who made it and also thanks to Todd Fischer, The Islander, and the Westport Maritime Museum for helping with the weekend.

September 18, 2013 | 2 Comments

Reminder: Send In Your Comments About Marine Spatial Planning

The sun is setting for public comments on the draft goals and objectives for Washington State’s Marine Spatial Planning.  The final day is next Monday, the 23rd.

If you haven’t already, take a few minutes and share your thoughts.

For more info, see our earlier blog post:
http://surfriderwashingtoncoast.blogspot.com/2013/08/protect-future-of-your-favorite-beach.html

September 13, 2013

Seattle Times Report on Ocean Acidification

Make sure to check out this amazing multi-media report on ocean acidification!

http://apps.seattletimes.com/reports/sea-change/2013/sep/11/pacific-ocean-perilous-turn-overview/

September 6, 2013

Marine Spatial Planning Comment Period is Open

Washington State is seeking public comment on the recently released draft goals and objectives for MSP, which is the process of mapping uses and resources of the marine environment so that they can be intelligently managed and new uses can be evaluated with better information.  In addition, a crucial part of MSP is involving stakeholders and the public in the process, and that’s why your input is so valuable.

Coastal recreators should be interested in this process because it can offer better protection of the ocean and beaches that we use for walking, clamming, surfing, kayaking, bird watching, and escaping the hustle and bustle of modern life.

Please take time to read the draft goals and objectives for MSP and provide any comments.  Your time investment will pay off in the future when your favorite beach is protected!  You can find the draft (called the “scoping document”), and comment cards here: http://www.msp.wa.gov/public-comment-period-open-for-marine-spatial-plan/

In addition to any issues you find, we recommend making the following suggestions:

  • Suggest adding this overarching goal: “Protect and preserve existing sustainable uses.”
  • Convey how important protection and access to recreational areas are to coastal communities who economically benefit and to the general public as a whole whose quality of life is enhanced by playing outside.
  • Emphasize the importance of protecting the marine ecosystem including important habitats, biodiversity, and ecological functions

Please email your comments to mspcomments@ecy.wa.gov by September 23, 2013.  Your voice is very important in helping shape the future of our valuable coastline.  Now is your chance to be heard!

More information about MSP can be found here: http://www.msp.wa.gov/

and

http://surfriderwashingtoncoast.blogspot.com/p/marine-spatial-planning_5.html

August 22, 2013

Be part of the future: participate in a study on recreational uses of Washington’s coast

What the survey is about: 
Surfrider and Ecotrust are developing a survey to document Non-Consumptive Ocean and Coastal Recreation on the Pacific Coast of Washington. The survey will ask you about where you recreate on the coast, what activities you do there, and the money you spend on those activities. Then we can make maps that show the density of recreation happening on our beaches and what they are worth in dollars. You can see how Oregon already completed a similar study.

Why you should take part:
The results of the survey will help coastal planning when we have to make important decisions about the future of our coastlines and ocean. You can see the map layers the state is pulling together at the new MSP.wa.gov website. If we can show the numbers of people using specific beaches for surfing and the money they bring into the local community, for example, then we can protect our surf breaks from development! (It’s called surfenomics- check out this article)

How it works:
When you see the survey advertised (on this blog or in your local surf shop) complete it and then pass it on to your friends. Or to get the survey sent to your inbox, email Casey at cdennehy@surfrider.org.

When:
Launch date TBD

More:
You can keep in touch with what’s going on at our Washington State Surfrider Chapters page, policy blog or Facebook page, or the State’s MSP website. Learn more about the economic value of coastal recreation at Save the Waves.

August 19, 2013

Why should I care about marine spatial planning?

Photo credit: Tyna McNair

All this talk about Marine Spatial Planning can be a bit confusing, especially for those of us who do not spend our time tackling legislative issues.  The truth is that the entire process of Marine Spatial Planning is really about the people living near and using the ocean, first and foremost.  Understanding how Marine Spatial Planning relates specifically to you and your recreational enjoyment is vital to the process.

Access to Recreational Areas
With a coastline of over 3,000 miles, Washington has a plethora of coastal areas to enjoy.  Despite its apparent abundance, continued development of the coast has limited public access to our coastal areas and beaches.  This includes public resources that we have a right to access.  This is one reason to take part in Marine Spatial Planning-to help keep industry out of our important recreational areas.  Various commercial activities like oil drilling, coal transport, or energy exploration pose threats to the waves and waters we value for their recreational opportunities like surfing and kayaking.  Anticipating and planning for changes in coastal commercial activity is vital for areas with high recreational value.  We can do this with Marine Spatial Planning.

Health of Recreational Areas
Keeping our recreational areas healthy is an important part of our experience outdoors.  After all, we do not want our children to play in polluted water.  Nor would we enjoy taking in a view of the beach inundated by plastic and other garbage.  We value the areas where we recreate, and part of that means taking care of them properly and making sure that their value is properly accounted for in the Marine Spatial Planning process.

Enjoyment for All
The ocean provides us with many natural resources and provides a myriad of benefits for humans and animals alike.  This is why we need to ensure that recreationalists are not priced out of areas and their hobbies-the oceans and beaches should be enjoyed by everyone.  Surfrider was born from an innate love of the water, and part of our mission is to protect that resource for the enjoyment of all.  Just because the coast has high economic value does not mean that only a subset of the population should enjoy it: the waves are for everyone.

Help with the Marine Spatial Planning process by understanding how it relates to you, and make sure to participate in the public commenting period (see previous post).  Remember, this process aims to bring multiple stakeholders together to create solutions that work for us all.  So help out the process and make sure that you are heard!

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